Meaningful inhibition: Exploring the role of meaning and modality in response inhibition

Contributed by tirso.gonzalez

If you use data from this collection please cite:
http://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.06.074

View ID Name Type
Field Value
AuthorsTirso Gonzalez Alam, Charlotte Murphy, Jonathan Smallwood and Elizabeth Jefferies
DescriptionIn two Go/No-Go experiments, we examined whether the neural mechanisms supporting response inhibition are influenced by the relevance of meaning to the decision, and by presentation modality (whether concepts were presented as words or images). In an on-line fMRI experiment, we found common regions for response inhibition across perceptual and conceptual decisions. These included the bilateral intraparietal sulcus and the right inferior frontal sulcus, whose neural responses have been linked to diverse cognitive demands in previous studies. In addition, we identified a cluster in ventral lateral occipital cortex that was sensitive to the modality of input, with a stronger response to No-Go than Go trials for meaningful images, compared to words with the same semantic content. In a second experiment, using resting-state fMRI, we explored how individual variation in the intrinsic connectivity of these activated regions related to variation in behavioural performance. Participants who showed stronger connectivity between common inhibition regions and limbic areas in medial temporal and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex were better at inhibition when this was driven by the meaning of the items. In addition, regions with a specific role in picture inhibition were more connected to a cluster in the basal ganglia for participants who were better at performing the picture task outside of the scanner.
JournalNeuroImage
Contributors
DOI10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.06.074
Field StrengthNone
id3158
Add DateNov. 12, 2017, 4:19 p.m.